3 Ways to Keep Your Home Healthy When Fall Allergies Hit

The onset of fall brings back treasured memories and plenty of opportunities to spend time outdoors with your family. But whether you head to the orchard or enjoy an evening together on the couch, it’s possible that you might succumb to seasonal allergies. Many Americans are experiencing more pronounced fall allergies than ever, as a matter of fact. You might think that by avoiding outside activities, you’ll be able to stave off the sneezes. But since studies show that levels of several organics can be two to five times higher indoors than outdoors, causing health problems when inhaled, the reality is that staying snug inside may not be enough to keep your allergy symptoms at bay. You can, however, take action to ensure your family stays healthy and happy this fall. Here are three ideas to start with.

Check For Excessive Humidity

With the cooler temperatures that accompany autumn, you might not think that humidity would be an important factor. But given the wet conditions that can present themselves at this time of year, you’ll want to do your due diligence. Residential humidity levels should be kept between 30% and 55% in order to maintain optimum air quality, but wet bathrooms, basements, and other areas could cause your humidity to be greater than you realize. In fact, an estimated 85% of American buildings have water damage or leaks, which means your home could be at risk for mold or mildew — which have been known to exacerbate respiratory conditions like allergies and asthma. You may need to use a humidifier throughout the fall to make sure your home is comfortable or even talk to a mold remediation specialist if you suspect there are growths that are contributing to your unwanted health symptoms.

Make Sure Your Air is Pure

When allergy season arrives, you’ll want to do everything you can to ensure that this debris doesn’t end up circulating through your home’s vents. Otherwise, you might end up bringing the outside in — and inhaling it frequently. It’s a good idea to change your air filters in your HVAC system during this time of year, particularly if you can’t remember the last time you did so. And while you’re at it, you could invest in a separate air purifier for key areas like the bedrooms. After all, we often use filters to purify the water we drink (which is handy, since only 3% of the planet’s water is freshwater). Why not filter the air you breathe while you’re at it? And if you haven’t had your HVAC system checked yet this year, schedule an appointment. Your technician can identify other problems that could be contributing to your allergies (or even save you money by fixing issues now).

Establish a Cleaning Schedule

A clean home is a healthy home, which means that springtime isn’t the only season that should be marked by a decluttering spree. It’s a good idea to vacuum and dust regularly (and to wear a mask when doing so!) — at least a few times a week. Letting these tasks pile up will only make allergies worse, so don’t delay in clearing off surfaces. Carpet is a harbinger of dust and other contaminants, so it’s a good idea to eliminate it when possible. And while it’s a good idea to do laundry regularly, make sure not to air dry your clothes outside, as this will likely bring that debris inside and on your person.

It’s not always easy to keep your family completely healthy during the fall, as bacterial exposure tends to increase around this time of year. But if you or your children suffer from seasonal allergies, making these small changes at home can make all the difference.

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