Horse Paintings in Greek Mythology

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Famous horse paintings have always been the charmers in Greek mythology through their extensive influence on art and literature. In ancient Greece, horses were revered as symbols of wealth, power, and status.

Horses have been considered as highly prestigious animals with deep insights and great empathy. They shared an outstanding share of pride in wars and are widely represented in ancient art through books, galleries, and museums.

The epic paintings of horses are of great importance as they tell us about ancient Greek culture. These are expensive oil-on-canvas found in National Art Galleries and State Museums because of their great value and demand.

The Horse Hair by Rosa Bonheur

The Horse Hair by Rosa Bonheur

The eccentric painting by the creative woman who was always ahead of her time, Rosa Bonheur, represents the horse market in lights in Paris. The Horse Hair is an oil-on-canvas painting that was painted in the year 18452. Later on, in the year 1855, Rosa made some finishing touches to the painting,

The painting depicts a scene where dealers sell horses at the horse market, located in the Boulevard deI” Hospital near the asylum Salpetriere. However, the asylum is not visible in the painting but can be found on the left side of the background.

The Horse Hair was an awe-inspiration for many artists from creative to literary worlds. After being drawn to this charismatic art by Rosa’sRosa’s realistic style, bold impression, and strong sense of movement, Poet Robert Becker wrote an anthology.

A Lion Attacking a Horse by George Stubbs

A Lion Attacking a Horse by George Stubbs

George Stubbs was a master of equestrian paintings who has been well known for his command of anatomy and its representation on the canvas. He painted A Lion Attacking a Horse with oil on canvas in the year 1762. The beautiful picturization of Stubbs is crafted in his most ordinary subject matter, which depicts a strong, brave, and muscular horse, with a beast from distant lands, a fully maned male lion.

George’s paintings focus on anatomy and detail the difference between the horse and its nemesis. The painting indicated that while the horse is masterfully rendered, the firehouse lion has enormous paws that do not correspond to respect, perspective, or proportion.

Lion’s fangs are like those of a poisonous snake biting into the back of the horseshoe’s lower neck. The painting lacks proportion between the lion’s body and its legs, indicating that Stubbs must have had enough access to animals and understand their anatomy. However, he could not imagine them in action and, on his own, projected how the whole scenario would appear.

Navajo Wild Horse Hunters by Charles Marion Russell

Navajo Wild Horse Hunters by Charles Marion Russell

The cowboy artist Charles Russell was highly regarded as he exhibited a deep sense of perspective and experience through his paintings time and again. The painting Wild Horse Hunters is one of the greatest gifts that he gifted to the art world even in the form of a painting reproduction. Painted in the year 1911, this oil on canvas by Russell is a rather typical yet important representation that showcases the Native American way of lifestyle in the Southwestern United States.

It describes the ever sinking Native control over the land and the loss of Native livelihoods with the European indulgence in the area. The shrinking of the bison population due to predatory hunting resulted in a significant shift towards horses. They became of utmost importance for the survival of many tribes, including the Navajo Nation.

The creativity here portrays a trivial inhuman practice and puts a mirror in front of a tribal technique and its way of life. It could be understood from such ultimate pieces of paintings that situations like this correspond to blur lines between what was traditionally Native and what became traditional because of the arrival of Europeans back then.

An Arab and His Horse in the Desert by Jean-Leon Gerome

An Arab and His Horse in the Desert by Jean-Leon Gerome

An Arab and His Horse in the Desert is Jean-Léon Gérôme’sGérôme‘s early Oriental paintings on canvas. On the forefront, it portrays an Arabic man cradling his horseshoe’s head in the desert, showcasing a very emotional scene. The last moment between the man who owns the horse and his loyal animal companion, the horse! It portrays an emotional connection between the two but a series of the whole cultural ethos of a symbiosis between humanity and its relationship with animals.

The painting is much more than a sublime landscape, depicting a final goodbye to the rider and horse in the harsh conditions of the desert. But in this piece of art, the artist presents a broad image of culture, the tribes and people of the desert who are highly dependent on their horses and camels for their survival.

Without such great care and effort by these animals, the tribe would surely perish. Gerome displays a specific relationship, which enables us to understand the whole broader importance of all this behind it as he saw it.

The Bottom Line

These horse paintings are marvels of creativity and carry forward a legacy that great artists have left behind for us to celebrate the rich and ancient art culture.

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